Member Search

Find a profile using the dropdown menus below.

Country
State / Region
Practice Area
Members Firms

News - 27 July 2020

The  fair  trade  regulator,  the  Competition  Commission  of  India  (“CCI”),  has  joined  other  peers  across  the  Globe  and  has  issued  a  brief  advisory  on  19  April  2020  for  guidance  of  businessmen  across  sectors  on  whether  limited  coordination  can  be  allowed  to  bridge  demand  and  supply  gap  during  the  nationwide  lockdown  due  to  COVID  19  pandemic  and  if  so  to  what  extent.  

The  advisory  published  on  the  official  website  can  be  viewed  here

We  provide  below  a  gist  of  the  DO’s  &  DON’T’s  for  benefit  of  our  readers.  

What  you  CAN  DO  during  COVID-19:

1.You  may  coordinate  certain  activities  in  a  limited  way,  by  way  of  sharing  data  on  stock  levels,  timings  of  operation,  sharing  of  distribution  network  and  infrastructure,  transport  logistics,  R  &  D,  production  etc.  to  ensure  continued  supply  and  fair  distribution  of  products  (e.g.  medical  and  healthcare  products  such  as  ventilators,  face  masks,  gloves,  vaccines  etc.  and  essential  commodities)  &  services  (e.g.  logistics,  testing  etc.)  during  COVID-19,  provided  such  coordination  does  not  lead  to  either  price  fixing,  limiting  or  allocation  of  markets  etc.  as  mentioned  and  prohibited  under  sub  section  3  of  section  3  of  the  Competition  Act,  2002.

2.You  may  enter  into  JOINT  VENTURES  to  undertake  the  above  mentioned  coordinated  ventures  to  assist  the  government  or  the  authorities  concerned  to  fight  the  Corona  Virus  pandemic  to  ensure  continued  supply  and  fair  distribution  of  products  (e.g.  medical  and  healthcare  products  such  as  ventilators,  face  masks,  gloves,  vaccines  etc.  and  essential  commodities)  &  services  (e.g.  logistics,  testing  etc.).

3.However,  such  JOINT  VENTURES  must  be  shown  to  lead  to  efficiency  gains  to  escape  any  possible  challenge  thereof  as  an  anti-competitive  agreement  to  share,  allocate  or  limit  or  control  price,  markets  etc.  The  increase  in  efficiency  must  relate  to  efficiency  in  production,  supply,  distribution,  storage,  acquisition  or  control  of  goods  or  provision  of  services.  Besides,  it  may  also  lead  to  the  accrual  of  benefits  to  consumers;  improvement  in  production  or  distribution  of  goods  or  provision  of  services;  and  promotion  of  technical,  scientific  and  economic  development  by  means  of  production  or  distribution  of  goods  or  provision  of  services.

What  you  CAN  NOT  DO  during  COVID-19

1.Any  co-ordination  with  your  competitors  which  may  lead  to  either  price  fixing,  limiting  or  allocation  of  markets  etc.  as  mentioned  and  prohibited  under  sub  section  3  of  section  3  of  the  Competition  Act,  2002.

2.Any  co-ordination  with  your  competitors  which  may  be  considered  as  DISPROPORTIONATE  AND  UNNECESSARY  to  address  concerns  arising  from  COVID-19.  This  may  vary  from  case  to  case  and  will  be  considered  on  the  facts  and  circumstances  of  each  case.

3.Apart  from  any  co-ordination  with  competitors  or  dealers  considered  necessary  and  proportionate  to  the  requirement  of  meeting  any  emergency  needs  during  the  COVID-19  crisis,  all  other  unilateral  business  conducts  or  market  behaviour,  by  any  firm  with  a  large  market  share  in  the  relevant  markets,  which  may  be  considered  either  exploitative  to  consumers  or  exclusionary  for  smaller  business  rivals  are  and  continue  to  be  prohibited  and  may  be  penalized  as  abuse  of  dominant  position  under  section  4  of  the  Act.

The  CCI  official  advisory  is  just  in  time  and  a  welcome  step.  It  will  be  noticed  that  unlike  the  competition  authorities  of  EU1.,  CCI  has  not  committed  itself  either  against  “active  intervention”  for  “necessary  and  temporary”  cooperation  between  competitors;  or  like  those  in  the  USA,  has  not  carved  out  certain  categories  of  collaborations2.  that  may  be  permitted  during  the  pandemic  or  like  in  the UK3.,  or  Holland,  where  exemption  is  granted  to  certain  sectors  by  invoking  relevant  provision  in  the  statute.    

In  our  view,  the  approach  taken  by  CCI  is  the  right  approach  suited  to  the  peculiar  conditions  in  India  because  the  existing  legal    framework  in  terms  of  assessing  the  appreciable  adverse  effect  in  competition  (“AAEC”)  under  the  Competition  Act,  2002  (the  Act)  is  flexible  and  enables  the  CCI,    to  undertake  a  case-by-case  analysis  taking  into  account  any  hardship/peculiarities  of  the  present  circumstances.  The  determination  of  AAEC  requires  a  balancing  of  its  procompetitive  effects  against  its  anticompetitive  effects,  mentioned  specifically  as  factors  under  Section  19(3)  of  the  Act.  For  instance,  one  of  the  factors  that  the  CCI  may  consider  while  assessing  the  impact  of  an  agreement  is  whether  it  enables  or  leads  to  “improvements  in  production  or  distribution  of  goods  or  provision  of  service”.  Similarly,  for  determining  the  unliteral  conduct  of  an  enterprise  with  a  strong  market  position  to  see  whether  an  abuse  of  dominant  position  has  occurred,  requires  the  CCI  to  consider  if  an    objective  justifications  exists  that  the  enterprise  had  (such  as,  protecting  the  quality  of  supply  chain,  or  meet  competition)  when  imposing  such  restrictions.  

MM  Sharma  

Head  -  Competition  Law  &  Policy  

Vaish  Associates  Advocates

E-    mmsharma@vaishlaw.com


1.  The European Competition Network has confirmed that its competition authorities will not actively intervene against necessary and temporary measures put in place in order to avoid a shortage of supply during COVID 19. Available at  -  https://ec.europa.eu/competition/ecn/202003_joint-statement_ecn_corona-crisis.pdf

2.  the Antitrust “Agencies” in USA i.e the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in a joint statement have clarified that certain collaborative actions designed to improve the health and safety response to the current pandemic such as research and development activities, sharing of technical know-how, etc. will be considered consistent with the applicable antitrust laws. Available at  -  https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/public_statements/1569593/statement_on_coronavirus_ftc-doj-3-24-20.pdf

3.  UK and Dutch competition authorities have taken welcome steps to allow cooperation in the food supply chain. UK Notification available at  -  http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2020/369/made


Man Mohan Sharma

Man Mohan Sharma

Firm: Vaish Associates Advocates
Country: India

Practice Area: Competition